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SEEDS Best Practice Example

On this page you will find 4 best practice examples from the project, which illustrate practical examples of the SEEDS Pedagogy with a step-by-step description and details on how to get started and what materials to use. 

Moreover you will find other examples of activities that took place in the project and pictures from different activities in preschools in Germany, Cyprus, Italy and Denmark. 

 

 

Learning about "The year in the garden" (Denmark)

The idea is to increase the childrens knowledge about vegetables and make them come alive with digital tools.

The competences we want to work with is among others language and creativity. And also help the children to understand what we call “The year of the garden”.

As part of that we want to make QR-codes in the garden, where you can hear the children tell about the vegetables, while you look at a childs drawing of e.g. a carrot telling about carrots.

Participating in the work were Preschool Children, Teachers, Janitor/helpers and parents – and can potentially involve gardeners and others with knowledge on nature, insects, etc.

Practicalities:

The concept is design for children between 5 and 6 years old and amount of children that can participate, depends on the amount of Teachers present.

The concept is done over potentially the entire garden season, but not with activities every day in the period.

Every activity can be done within two hours, but also stretched over longer time (Which is recommended)

The materials used are among others:

The garden: Seeds, paper, crayons

Technology: Mobile phone, Ipad (Camera and apps like My Talking Pet, Chatter Pix, PC, QR-codes

The Starting Point:

An open discussion with the children about which Vegetables you want in the garden. The follow up with activities like visiting the garden, make drawings, introduce the technology you want to use, etc

Pedagogical Methods and Principles:

The project is in one way very organized. On the other hand not. We have a plan, but we are constantly looking for a way to change it or ready to change it, if new and better ideas appears. An example is the Insect Hotel, that was not part of the original plan, but seem like a brilliant idea and was therefor included.

The pedagogical method is a mixture of the following:

Co-Collaboration: We develop together and each child can tell their own story within the concept.

Experimenting: We have not tried the mix between technology and vegetables, su this Is very new for us. The use of technology in general is also new.

Mixing real life and digital life: This project mixes both analog and digital, but in a way where the analog story is the main focus.

The Competences supported in this project are the following:

Creativity: Through involving the production of drawings, videos and storytelling

Collaboration: Through making plans for the garden together

Language skills: Through Telling the stories them selves (On behalf of the Plants)

Knowledge about the topic of nature: Through introduction to gardening, insects and animals.

Step by Step:

The concept is build around a set of activities following the year of the garden. The Activities can variate depending on what garden you have, the knowledge and access and to technology, what sort of extra activities you can do, etc.

1. Introduction to topic of the garden:

– A talk about gardens, what vegetables the children like, what insects and animals they know live in a garden, etc.

2. Concrete planning of which vegetables you want in the garden:

– Agreeing on what vegetables you want to plant

– Introduktion to the chosen vegetables

– A walk in the garden to find out where to plant them

3. Working with the knowledge about the plants:

– Making Drawings of the vegetables.

– Giving the vegetables eyes and mouth

– Introduction to iPad apps, such as My Talking pet, Chatter Pics and Puppet Pals. These apps will be used to make videos about the vegetables.

– Introduction to QR codes and how you use them for introductions to the plants.

4. Making the vegetables come alive:

(Link to a video)

– Use the drawings with the apps and videoes where the vegetables tell about them selves.

5. Planting the seeds:

– Go into the garden and plant the seeds

6. Connecting the vegetables videos with the vegetables in the garden:

– Create QR codes for the videos

– Print out the QR codes

– Set the printed QR-codes into the garden

Follow up ideas could be:

– “Play” with Sprouts and look at how the grow – roots, how fast the grow, look at the differences

– Taste and smell to the flowers and vegetables make e.g. jam and juice

– Build an insect hotel

In a way the ideas can be organized in the same way as an explorative activity, but can also be a logic extra level in the concept of “The year of the garden”.

Copying Intention

The first phase of the SEEDS pedagogy begins with perhaps a very traditional way of thinking about teaching and learning. One does not need to start here but for many teachers this is a traditional way of thinking about learning. The question is closed. The teacher is the one who decides what is to be learned and how it is to be learned. The teacher is the expert and takes responsibility for deciding how the learners will approach the learning and what the intended result of their learning will be beforehand. This is why this phase is called copying intention. One Danish institution has worked with the outside environment and the growing of an edible garden. The challenge was to link this work with digital technology in a meaningful way. Working in a garden means understanding the seasons – that there is a time for everything and each period of time has different requirements. There are plants to be sown, soil to be tended, conditions need to be right (heat and water) and there needs to be an awareness of what bio-diversity is needed for optimal growth e.g. bees, insects, soil conditions etc. While there is a lot of knowledge online about all of this the teachers wanted to the children to take a different approach by being producers not only of vegetables but of information about what the vegetable needs for the best growth possible. The children had experience of tending a garden, sowing and cultivating plants. The children were asked to make a drawing of the vegetable they were growing. The teacher introduced apps (my talking pet?) that allowed the children animate their drawings. The vegetable was given a voice (the child’s) and could now talk about how it could be eaten, or what kind of growing conditions it needed depending on what information the child thought was important. This meant formulating a story for others. 

Discovering Potential

The next phase may also be recognizable to many teachers. The intention is to allow for new experiences and to embed learning. Next the teacher introduced the QR code that allows someone to scan and get the information. The experience of walking through the garden is changed as others can see and hear the information that the children think important. The children were the main actors in this process being responsible for the drawing, the animation and the text and voice over.

Seeking Transformation

In the next phase, the teacher may ask questions that she does not have the answer to – or use questions that come from the children, to which she again does not have the answer. The children then began asking other questions about the garden. This meant that the teacher found out that other adults could be important for the children to learn about plants that included bringing for example the janitor, parents, and other adults who have an interest or expertise in bio-diversity. For example, the importance of insects suddenly became interesting for the children. One child had seen an insect hotel that started another outdoor project. The children became involved in this work and made pictures of different insects, animated these drawing and made short information videos about what the insects were doing in the garden and why they needed refuge in the hotel. The work in the garden is not only about the environment. Conversations about what to plant also involved what children like to eat, and what they have not eaten. The conversations extended to how we can prepare different foods and how versatile a vegetable might be. The children became involved in making jams and juices.

Establishing a common value

In the phase following this the process becomes much more open. The group discuss what they would like to do. One child suggested that the QR codes could be used to help newcomers find their way around the school. They made drawings of different areas and the rules that applied for the area. The group will decide quite quickly what is important and meaningful for them. Here we note the motivation of the children and the concentration and engagement they exhibit when they have ownership of their learning process. The teacher’s role is, not only to support learning, but also to make sure that there is critical reflection and their competencies become visible. The process does not end here. As the group finds out what is important to them, what is meaningful and of value they will find the path they want to take. This journey is dependent on the group of learners and the ecology they find themselves in.

Programming Botley and Beebot for pentomino solutions (Cyprus)

This activity was prepared by B’ Palaiometocho Public Kindergarten  in Nicosia, Cyprus.

Introduction:

The activity was designed to help children understand how to give directions for space by transferring what they learned in math through programming (beebot and botley).  They used raw material such as pentomino puzzles, markers and pencils and technologies such as beebots and botley.

The objectives of the activity:

  • Strengthen collaboration and communication by encouraging children to talk to each other and exchange ideas on how to the robots (botley and beebot) will get to the box and at a later stage to the 5 boxes of the pentomino puzzles.
  • Increase their capacity to perceive space by helping children understand concepts such as left, right, front, and back.
  • Learn how to critically-think and assess whether a solution works or not. Children explored different solutions by testing them.
  • Enhance verbal and written communication. Children explained what they think by taking into account each other’s ideas and thoughts.
  • Strengthen problem-solving skills by trying to figure out how to solve a problem.
  • Learn how to record solutions by using botley cards or making their solutions by pointing the route they are planning to follow.
  • Strengthen critical-thinking skills and children feel empowered.

Strengthen patience and perseverance by exploring different solutions and testing out different ideas.

Praticalities:

Children’s average age: 4-6 years old

Number of teachers: 1

Number of children: 35

Duration of the activity: 20’x3

Materials:

Circuits, nylon, markers, pentomino solutions/puzzles, paper boards, Botley cards, paper, pencils, beebot, botley

Starting Point:

Children had the opportunity to play and experiment with the botley and the beebot and learn how they work.

Pedagogical Methods and Principles:

By exploring how each robot moves, children enhanced their communication skills. They learned how to collaborate with each other to measure and create squared on the board.

Children used critical-thinking skills through by solving the pentomino puzzles and having the robots moving across the squares. They learned how to take into account each other’s ideas while they were experimenting with the robots.

They learned how to observe and record similarities and differences.

Step by step:

Step 1: Children measured botley steps in order to create squares on the board.  

Step 2: Children recorded different routes in order to get to the robot.

Step 3: Then after playing with the beebot, they compared it with the botley (recorded similarities and differences)

Step 4: Then, they measured the steps of the beebot and created squares for it to move.

Step 5: Then they played with the beebot and the botley and added pentomino solutions to guide them through the squares.

Step 6: Children created their own robots and named one the Palaiometocho Bot (name of the school and the town).

Step 7: Then, they used the robots to travel to the SEEDS countries.

Other suggestions:

Using different robots to explore how each robot moves and how they react to obstacles.

Using applications on tablet to create story characters using the botley and the beebot.

Copying Intention

The first phase of the SEEDS pedagogy begins with perhaps a very traditional way of thinking about teaching and learning. One does not need to start here but for many teachers this is a traditional way of thinking about learning. The question is closed. The teacher is the one who decides what is to be learned and how it is to be learned. The teacher is the expert and takes responsibility for deciding how the learners will approach the learning and what the intended result of their learning will be beforehand. This is why this phase is called copying intention. In a Cypriot institution, the teacher wanted to combine maths and working with the Beebot. The children were aged 4-6 years. The children worked together sharing a Beebot between them. The teacher began by introducing them to the Beebot and let them find out what the buttons were for. Once the children had experience of this the teacher asked them to make the Beebot move from one position to another. The Beebots were lined up and the children had to work out how many times they should press the forward button to reach the destination. The teacher asked the children how they knew how many times to press the button. There was a discussion about guessing and being right or wrong.

 

Discovering Potential

The next phase may also be recognizable to many teachers. The intention is to allow for new experiences and to embed learning. The teacher then asked the children to find out how far the Beebot could travel when the button was pushed once. She provided different material in the form of building blocks that could be fitted together. The children found out that they could ‘measure’ the step of the Beebot. They measured the step by putting blocks together to correspond with the distance travelled. For example, one group found that nine blocks corresponded to one Beebot step. When they had discussed the different materials and which was ‘best’ for measuring, the teacher gave the children a large mat that was divided up into squares where each square represented one Beebot step. The children could then plan the route that the Beebot could take across the mat. The teacher introduced pictures that could be inserted into a square on the mat. The children chose the pictures they wanted for their mat. Now one child could tell another that the Beebot should travel to the horse.

 

Seeking Transformation

In the next phase, the teacher may ask questions that she does not have the answer to – or use questions that come from the children, to which she again does not have the answer. The children had some experience with a Botley and wanted to know if it could move over the mat in the same way as the Beebot. Some children were more interested in making up stories about the Beebot and the pictures. Others wanted to put their own drawings on the mat.

 

Establishing a common value

In the following phase, the process becomes much more open. The group discuss what they would like to do. Again, the children had experience of using pentomino puzzles and were curious about solving them with both the Botley and the Beebot. Through these activities the children familiarised themselves with the robots, learned about difference and about measuring and recording for comparison.

Bremen (Germany)

The idea is to increase the childrens knowledge about vegetables and make them come alive with digital tools.

The competences we want to work with is among others language and creativity. And also help the children to understand what we call “The year of the garden”.

As part of that we want to make QR-codes in the garden, where you can hear the children tell about the vegetables, while you look at a childs drawing of e.g. a carrot telling about carrots.

Participating in the work were Preschool Children, Teachers, Janitor/helpers and parents – and can potentially involve gardeners and others with knowledge on nature, insects, etc.

Practicalities:

The concept is design for children between 5 and 6 years old and amount of children that can participate, depends on the amount of Teachers present.

The concept is done over potentially the entire garden season, but not with activities every day in the period.

Every activity can be done within two hours, but also stretched over longer time (Which is recommended)

The materials used are among others:

The garden: Seeds, paper, crayons

Technology: Mobile phone, Ipad (Camera and apps like My Talking Pet, Chatter Pix, PC, QR-codes

The Starting Point:

An open discussion with the children about which Vegetables you want in the garden. The follow up with activities like visiting the garden, make drawings, introduce the technology you want to use, etc

Pedagogical Methods and Principles:

The project is in one way very organized. On the other hand not. We have a plan, but we are constantly looking for a way to change it or ready to change it, if new and better ideas appears. An example is the Insect Hotel, that was not part of the original plan, but seem like a brilliant idea and was therefor included.

The pedagogical method is a mixture of the following:

Co-Collaboration: We develop together and each child can tell their own story within the concept.

Experimenting: We have not tried the mix between technology and vegetables, su this Is very new for us. The use of technology in general is also new.

Mixing real life and digital life: This project mixes both analog and digital, but in a way where the analog story is the main focus.

The Competences supported in this project are the following:

Creativity: Through involving the production of drawings, videos and storytelling

Collaboration: Through making plans for the garden together

Language skills: Through Telling the stories them selves (On behalf of the Plants)

Knowledge about the topic of nature: Through introduction to gardening, insects and animals.

Step by Step:

The concept is build around a set of activities following the year of the garden. The Activities can variate depending on what garden you have, the knowledge and access and to technology, what sort of extra activities you can do, etc.

1. Introduction to topic of the garden:

– A talk about gardens, what vegetables the children like, what insects and animals they know live in a garden, etc.

2. Concrete planning of which vegetables you want in the garden:

– Agreeing on what vegetables you want to plant

– Introduktion to the chosen vegetables

– A walk in the garden to find out where to plant them

3. Working with the knowledge about the plants:

– Making Drawings of the vegetables.

– Giving the vegetables eyes and mouth

– Introduction to iPad apps, such as My Talking pet, Chatter Pics and Puppet Pals. These apps will be used to make videos about the vegetables.

– Introduction to QR codes and how you use them for introductions to the plants.

4. Making the vegetables come alive:

(Link to a video)

– Use the drawings with the apps and videoes where the vegetables tell about them selves.

5. Planting the seeds:

– Go into the garden and plant the seeds

6. Connecting the vegetables videos with the vegetables in the garden:

– Create QR codes for the videos

– Print out the QR codes

– Set the printed QR-codes into the garden

Follow up ideas could be:

– “Play” with Sprouts and look at how the grow – roots, how fast the grow, look at the differences

– Taste and smell to the flowers and vegetables make e.g. jam and juice

– Build an insect hotel

In a way the ideas can be organized in the same way as an explorative activity, but can also be a logic extra level in the concept of “The year of the garden”.

Copying Intention

The first phase of the SEEDS pedagogy begins with perhaps a very traditional way of thinking about teaching and learning. One does not need to start here but for many teachers this is a traditional way of thinking about learning. The question is closed. The teacher is the one who decides what is to be learned and how it is to be learned. The teacher is the expert and takes responsibility for deciding how the learners will approach the learning and what the intended result of their learning will be beforehand. This is why this phase is called copying intention. The teacher has a limited number of Beebots. She asks the children to work in pairs with one Beebot between them. She begins by explaining that the buttons tell the Beebot where it should move. The teacher asks one child from the group to make the Beebot move across the floor to another child. The child presses the buttons. The child finds out which button makes the Beebot move forward. The teacher asks if they can make the Beebot turn. The children find out that the buttons have to be pressed in sequence and maybe multiple numbers of times. The teacher then made up some activities with different goals to allow the children to try out the buttons and find out what they need to do to make the Beebot reach the destination. The word programming may also be introduced. The children find out that ‘programming’ is not difficult.

Discovering Potential

The next phase may also be recognizable to many teachers. The intention is to allow for new experiences and to embed learning. In this example, the teacher introduces ready-made tiles that  correspond to the distance when the button is pressed once. (These were made in a Fablab for the school). The teacher shows the children how she can get the Beebot to move across the tiles following the route she has made. She has drawn a beehive on one tile (home) and a flower on another. She questions the children on how to get the Beebot to move from home to the flower. They try this together and then she gives tiles to each group of children. They lay them out and program the Beebot to move from home to their flower. This may involve calculating turning and moving forward multiple times. The introduction of tiles, or another material, can help challenge skills and develop the critical thinking of the child. Here the teacher becomes a facilitator, allowing the children to design their own formation of the tiles. The outside world, relating to real bees, for example, may be drawn in by talking about the bee flying to a flower to collect nectar. Drawing a flower on the tile and a honeycomb on another will be part of the exercise. In this phase, the children will naturally look at what others (groups) are doing and will get ideas or copy them. The notion of copying in this scenario is encouraged as copying means that there will be, by default, some kind of transformation and difference.

Seeking Transformation

In the next phase, the teacher may ask questions that she does not have the answer to – or use questions that come from the children, to which she again does not have the answer. In this example the children asked what the object on the back of the Beebot was for. When they were told that it could be used to hold a pen the children asked for paper. In this phase, it is the children who came up with ideas and asked questions. The teacher, moving from facilitator to participator became part of the group and the results of the activity changed it and transformed the learning to include other knowledge. Here the openness to the outside world and to narratives may be of significant importance.

Establishing a common value

In the phase following this the process becomes much more open. The group discuss what they would like to do. One child wanted the beebot to fly, another wanted to put it with an ozobot and see if they could become friends. The group will decide quite quickly what is important and meaningful for them. Here we note the motivation of the children and the concentration and engagement they exhibit when they have ownership of their learning process. The teacher’s role is, not only to support learning, but also to make sure that there is critical reflection and their competencies become visible. The process does not end here. As the group finds out what is important to them, what is meaningful and of value they will find the path they want to take. This journey is dependent on the group of learners and the ecology they find themselves in.

Discover our Bodies (Italy)

In pre-schools, it is fundamental for educators to always think on new and stimulating ways of discovery. This activity has been developed by the educators of La Piccola Casa nel Bosco, a pre-school in Palermo (Italy).

The activity was designed to let children discover their body and corporeality, in order to promote self-knowledge, through movement, expressiveness and sensory stimulation.

Main Objectives:

  • Promote individual growth through collaboration and play;
  • Build a positive self-image;
  • Implement educational strategies with the use of new technologies;
  • Know and use appropriate technologies for pre-schoolers (ozobot).

Practicalities

Children’s average age: 5 years old

Number of teachers: 2

Number of children: 6

Materials: ozobot, cardboard, markers

Duration of the activity: 2 hours

Starting Point

Teacher introduces the game-activity to children though guided conversation, and explains how to use the ozobot, a little toy robot that recognize lines and follow them.

Pedagogical Methods and Principles:

The Ozobot became a self-awareness tool. It could be used as mean for children to learn a foreign language.

Step by step

Step 1: Children lay down on the cardboard one at a time.

Step 2: Children draw the silhouette of the lying companions.

Step 3: Children become aware of the parts of their body through the ozobot that follows their silhouette.

 

Other suggestions:

Suggestion 1: Each child could divide the parts of their drawings following the teacher’s instructions (i.e head, arms, hands, torso, feet) and let the ozobot explore them.

Suggestion 2: To enhance the awareness on their bodies, children can touch the parts of their bodies when the ozobot pass on it.

Suggestion 3: Children could say aloud the parts of the body when the ozobot pass on them, and also translate them in English to learn a learning a foreign language.

 

Copying Intention

The first phase of the SEEDS pedagogy begins with perhaps a very traditional way of thinking about teaching and learning. One does not need to start here but for many teachers this is a traditional way of thinking about learning. The question is closed. The teacher is the one who decides what is to be learned and how it is to be learned. The teacher is the expert and takes responsibility for deciding how the learners will approach the learning and what the intended result of their learning will be beforehand. This is why this phase is called copying intention. In a Sicilian institution, the teacher wanted to introduce children aged 2-3 years to Ozobots. The teacher shows the children the Ozobot that can follow a line. The children are given pens so that they can draw a line. The Ozobot is place on their line and they watch to see if it can ‘see’ the line. The teacher helps the children who have difficulty making a line the Ozobot can ‘see’. The line did not have to be a straight line so the children could make their own paths for the Ozobot to follow. The children make a drawing of, for example a house or an animal, and a path. The Ozobot is placed on the path and they find out if it can get to the house or animal.

Discovering Potential

The next phase may also be recognizable to many teachers. The intention is to allow for new experiences and to embed learning. In the next activity, the children draw a line around their hand and then find out if the Ozobot can follow it. Then the teacher suggests that they could get the robot to move around their whole body if someone could draw it on the floor. One child lies down on a large piece of card and the teacher draws a line around their body. The children were excited to see that the Ozobot could follow the line around the body which introduced body parts and maybe new language into the conversation. The silhouettes were made for a number of children who also painted their drawings so that the different body parts had different colours. The teacher shows them that if they put different colours into the line they can make the Ozobot stop at certain points around the body. The children were happy to experiment using the Ozobot and the life-sized drawings they had made of themselves.

Seeking Transformation

In the next phase, the teacher may ask questions that she does not have the answer to – or use questions that come from the children, to which she again does not have the answer. In later activities, the teacher planned to introduce the idea of organs of the body and talk about where they were situated and what they did. The teacher found that the activity encouraged language development and an interest in the body and its functions.

Establishing a common value

In the phase following this the process becomes much more open. The group discuss what they would like to do. As this is a very young group of children the teacher made suggestions to find out what the children were interested in. In a later activity, the teacher planned to introduce LED lights to the children’s drawings as they were fascinated by the different lights on the Ozobot. The teacher’s role is, not only to support learning, but also to make sure that there is critical reflection and their competencies become visible. The process does not end here. As the group finds out what is important to them, what is meaningful and of value they will find the path they want to take. This journey is dependent on the group of learners and the ecology they find themselves in.

 

Other practices examples

This activity was prepared by Little Alchemists Nursery School in Nicosia, Cyprus.

The activity was designed to encourage children to explore by playing, be creative and learn more about how to give directions by using a combination of different raw material (such as markers, paper, pencils, crayons, etc.) and technology (beebot).

The objectives of the activity:

  • Strengthen collaboration and communication
  • Familiarize children with technology uses
  • Strengthen children’s creativity skills
  • Enhance children’s critical-thinking skills
  • Enhance oral communication
  • Strengthen children’s rational-thinking skills

Practicalities:

Children’s average age: 2.4-4.5 years old

Number of teachers: 3

Number of children: 10-12

Duration of the activity: 20’x8-12times

Materials:

Beebot, foam boards, paints, crayons, newspapers, balloons, glue, flour, stickers, toothpicks, markers, paintbrushes, glitter, lights and materials from outdoors area such as sand and small rocks.

Starting Point:

Children explored how to use the beebot by using a small a board which was divided in several boxes (9 boxes – 3×3). The box was used as a trial before moving into a bigger track.

Step by step:

Step 1: Children selected a drawing from the wall and called it LANS. Then they recorded their voices through the MyTalkingPet App, and heard their voices back as LANS. This made them feel that LANS had a voice and it can express itself.

Step 2: Children asked LANS to make a nursery tour through MyTalkingPet.

Step 3: Children used balloons to create planets as presented in the pictures. They painted them after talking with each other and deciding which materials to use.

Step 4: Children had the chance to explore the miniature of the Nursery school which was built on board (paper with boxes) and they tried to understand what it is and how to use LANS (beebot).

Step 5: Children decided which rooms they want to show to LANS. Then they took the initiative to show LANS the rooms by programming the beebot.

Step 6: Teachers completed the planet model and children placed an ozobot (LANS’ spacecraft) on the black line and observed its moves. The black line was created by the teachers.

Step 7: LANS travelled through space through its spacecraft by moving across the black line.

Other suggestions:

Children can use LANS or its spacecraft to explore different topics and subjects.

They can use applications to give voice to characters.

Pedagogical methods and principles:

MyTalkingPet gave the children the opportunity to give voice to toys and fictional characters to create their own stories. They also used the same app to record their voice, thus participating in the story in fun and creative ways.

They used this opportunity to discuss how they wanted the solar system to look like. They also discussed which rooms they wanted to show to LANS and collaborated with each other to programme the beebot and understand how it works.

Children used their rational-thinking skills and their critical thinking skills to programme the beebot and understand how the ozobot moves.

Introduction:

This intercultural activity has been developed in a pre-school (Ubuntu – Palermo, Italy) mainly attended by migrant children.

It was designed to strengthen children awareness on the world, and of each other. In this activity, bee-bot helped to improve children collaboration and communication.

 

Main objectives:

  • Strengthen individual and group identity;
  • Experience citizenship so that a child can positively orient himself, also in relation to the others;
  • Encourage self-knowledge and recognise its own identity;
  • Educate to diversity;
  • Stimulate curiosity;
  • Feeling part of a community;
  • Promote the ability to collaborate.

Practicalities:

Children’s average age: 4 years old

Number of teachers: 1

Number of children: 5

Duration of the activity: 2 hours

Materials: bee-bot, paper, pencils, glue, scissors

Starting Point:

Teacher explains students that Bee-Bot is a programmable floor robot that can move forward or backward, or to turn right or left.

Step by Step:

Step 1: The teacher help children to draw a word, focusing on their countries of origin.

Step 2: Everyone draw, paint and clip human figure, representing them.

Step 3. They glue the figures in the poster with the world.

Step 4. Children make the bee-bot to go around the world with them, using it as tourist guide and travelling companion.

This concept is design and tried out by the preschool “Paddehatten” in Grejs outside Vejle.

Introduction:

Participating in the project: Children age 5-6, PreSchool Teachers, Parents and a Preschool in Nicosia

 

The goal is to strengthen the pedagogical work with 21st century skills. With a particular focus on the children’s ability to reflect, think critically, be creative and collaborative in an inclusive way.

 

The formation and learning of children is a complex process that takes place in an active interaction between the child and its surroundings. The child has to form his or her self and identity and learn many skills, knowledge and values ​​in order to become a complete human being mastering life. It can be the ability to engage in social contexts, interfere with the development of society and be critical thinking, take other people into account, be creative both on their own, but also on behalf of society.

Given the above, it is important that we hold it up against a world where digital is becoming more and more important. There are also increasing expectations on what competences the children must have and what we as educators can set up of when it comes to frameworks and structure for the use of digital media. Therefore, we as part of the project also will experiment with how the digital media can support children’s education and learning. Still based on the fact that children are creative and experimental and that various digital medias are seen an educational tool in the “everyday life” and is not an issue in itself.

Practicalities:

The concept is design for children between 4 and 6 years old and amount of children that can participate, depends on the amount of Teachers present.

 

The concept is done over a period of 2-3 months, but not with activities every day in the period.

 

Every activity can be done within one hour, but also stretched over longer time (Which is recommended)

 

The materials used can be anything from paper, pens, scissors, tablet, music etc. In principal everything that you can think of when it comes to illustrating “A good life for children”.

– When it comes to technology: you need iPAds or phones and Primarily Camera App.

Starting Point:

An open discussion with the children about what a good life for children can be. What do they think? How can we exame it? What do we need to do so?

From there you decide what the next steps might be.

Step by step:

Using philosophical conversations for children:

An importen part is the use philosophical conversations with the children as a reflection tool. This gives a better platform for involving children’s thinking and reflection, and it can give a deeper understanding of how the individual child thinks, and through the conversations gives the children a greater understanding and a “language” the fits with the world we are surrounded by.

 

Decoration of a wall:

The starting point for the work is the construction of wall decoration consisting of pictures. The pictures should illustrate different elements in relation to what the children think is a good life.

The selection of pictures is divided into three rounds.

 

Round 1: The individual child’s own perception of “ a good life for children”:

 

  1. Based on the method of Philosophical Conversations, start with talking with the children about what they think is the good childhood life, from their own point of view: What they think themselves? (It is important that they already form their own opinion here)

 

The conversations can be based on the following considerations:

Who am I?

What am I interested in?

What do I know?

What can I?

 

  1. Parental involvement: Write to the parents and introduce them to the theme.

 

  1. Ask the parents to talk to their children about what a good for children is like at home.

 

  1. Ask the children and parents to select 3 good pictures of a good life for children. The pictures will be used for decorating the wall in the Preschool.

 

  1. In the preschool, the pictures will be used for a common talk with the children about: What they think about the pictures, whether there are things the children agree on disagree, etc.

 

Round 2: The nearest world around us:

 

In the second round you explore the immediate world around you. First, take your starting point in the childrens room in the preschool and the life you and the children have there, then you can ask the children and colleagues in the other Preschool rooms about what they think a good life for children:

 

  1. What do the children think is the good life when it comes to the preschool?

 

  1. The children take pictures of the things they think are part of the good life and the pictures are also hung on the wall.

 

  1. As in Round 1, the pictures are used for a common conversation with the children about what they think about the pictures, whether there are things the children agree on or disagree on, etc.

 

Round 3: The outside world

 

The third round explores the world outside the preschool. It may be to:

 

  1. Ask adults in kindergarten or outside about the good life for children.
  2. Ask grandparents what the good childhood life was like when they were young.
  3. Asking children in other countries. If you do not have contact with a Preschool in another Country, the E-twinning platform may be a place to start. Here Preschools meet and collaborate across national borders
  4. Investigate what rights children have. For example, ask a politician, A childrens organization or similar.
  5. Investigate what the UN’s 17 development goals mean for children

 

Round 4: Find new ideas based on the collected material

 

When you’re done with decorating your wall, it’s time to talk and play with the thoughts and opinions you have collected along the way:

 

Which do you like?

Is there anything we need to find a solution to?

If the Children should have a common list of what a good life children, what should be part of it?

 

Round 5: Present your knowledge to others:

Finally, you present your work to others, such as:

 

– Other children in the Preschool.

– For the parents

– In a public place, such as a library or similar

– Invited guests.

Other Suggestions:

1. Bringing in other topics: A green life, Good and healthy food, Art, etc. The format of discussions and making an exhibitions based on that can work with lots of topics and can extended to also include artifacts and art production.

As an example working with nature, insects, etc.

2. It fits great with working with the UN’s 17 development goals and what they mean for children.

Pedagogical Methods and Principles:

The project is in a way very organized. There is a clear plan on the types of activities. But within the activies everything is very open.

The children decide what a good life for children is, but they have to agree on what they want to put on to the wall.

This might change as we go along and get new inputs from people outside the group.

The pedagogical method is a mixture of the following:

Co-Collaboration: We develop the project together and each child had a voice and a saying.

Experimenting: In particular when inviting others to join. The the children might need to accept and even incorporate other ideas than the ones they started with. This might change to view and thoughts on life.

Mixing real life and digital life: This project mixes both analog and digital, but in a way where the analog story is the main focus. The digital is mainly used for documenting suggestions on what the good life can be.

The Competences supported in this project are the following:

Critical thinking: Through chosen things for the wall and discuss what to put on the wall and what should be part of the “Good life list”. Among others understanding that people see differently on things.

Collaboration: Through making decisions on what to put on the wall.

Research: Through asking others about the thoughts on the good life.

Language skills: Through discussing the topic of what a good life is.

Knowledge about life: Through all the different suggestions given from many different people.

How and when do these activities support what competences or themes or important questions?

Introduction:

Examing Robots by building and playing with them is about introducing children to robots in a creative way, where research and experiments with materials plays an important part in understanding what we can use robots for.

Among others, they get to design their own robots with different types of material. Figure out what the robots functionality should be. Visit places where they use robots in real life, build a city for the own robots and make videos about the robots.

In this case the children learn about robots, are introduced to the first basic steps in learning to program, Work creatively with designing their own robots and seeing the difference between different types of materials.

Practicalities:

The concept is design for children between 4 and 6 years old and amount of children that can participate, depends on the amount of Teachers present.

The concept is done over a period of 2 months, but not with activities every day in the period.

Every activity can be done within two hours, but also stretsch over longer time (Which is recommended)

The materials used for building robots and the robot city are among others:

– Lego, Clay, Paper, decoration material, upcycled material, fabrics, etc. Actually anything goes.

– When it comes to technology: you need BeeBots (But you can also use other robots for children like Ozobots) and Camera Apps.

The Starting Point:

An open discussion with the children about what robots are and what they can do and the a practical experiment with building Lego Robots.

Step by step:

The basic idea for the activities is that different types of material can change the children’s understanding of what robots are.

The activities are built on the following types of activities:

1. Brief introduction and discussion with the children about robots and what they know about them:

Here it is important not to make it into a normal introduction of facts about robots, but to talk more about what the children know.

2. Build robots in Lego:

The kids build their own robots in Lego. They decide for themselves how the robots should look and what they can do. The robots do not need to have functions, but the experience from the project at “Mælkebøtten” was that when working with Lego, the children often gave the Robots functions. One example was a robot that could grab people falling out of airplanes.

3. Make robots in clay, and other material:

Same starting point as with Lego. The children decide for themselves what the robots should look like and what they can do. In this case, the choice of clay as material meant that the children at the “Mælkebøtten” ended up having more focus on the appearance and body of the robots (Such as arms, legs, face, etc) than on the actual function.

4. Introduction to digital robots:

When working with BeeBots and BlueBots, you can give your children the first understanding of programming robots and make them up to do something for one.

The approaches can be many:

– Learning to control and program the robots, for example how to make the drive through mazes.

– Use the robots to do drawings by assembling a pen on the robot and move it around on a piece of paper.

– Build a town for the Beebots based on recycling material, talk about how the robots live and let them “live” in the same room as the children at the Kindergarden.

– Invent new games the robots can be part of or include the robots in existing old childrens games.

– Make movies with the robots

5. Bring you Robot Day:

Organize a special robot day where the children bring a robot from their home. It can be toys they have, but also household robots like vacuum cleaning robots, etc.

The children introduce each other to the different robots and this is used to talk about what the children and their family use robots for at home.

6. Field Trips and other visits:

As part of the project, visits can be made to places where robots are used. Examples include book delivery robots at the local library, production robots at a local business, etc

7. Involvement of parents:

If your group of children have parents working with robots, you can invite them to come and tell about it.

Other suggestions:

Follow up ideas could be:

– Building your own experimental and creative Science space, with focus on similar topics and using the same method, among others trying stuff out with changing materials

– Using the method in a creative Christmas present workshop format.

Pedagogical Method and Principles:

The project has a clear topic and some ideas on what type of activities you can do, but still changes as we go along. So it’s more a pontential path than a plan.

The pedagogical method is a mixture of the following:

Co-Collaboration: We exam the topic together.

Experimenting: Through the use of various kinds of material.

Mixing real life and digital life: We visit places where they have robots, We play with digital robots and we build our own “analog robots”.

The Competences supported in this project are the following:

Critical thinking: Through discussions on what robots can do and inventing robots that can do things we choose our selfs.

Collaboration: We collaborate through build a common robot city

Research: Through visiting places with robots and inviting parents to tell about the robot related work.

Pictures from the project activities in preschools

CONTACT

Banegårdspladsen 6, 1. sal, 7100 Vejle

+45 7681 3880

vifin@vejle.dk


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